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Bowling for Business - Team Triad's Time Out

The North Jersey Regional Chamber of Commerce's (NJRCC) "Bowling for Business" event was held on August 13 at Garden Palace located at 42 Lakeview Avenue, Clifton. Chamber members gathered for networking and entertainment, and the event proceeds benefitted the Chamber Foundation.

Bowling for Business - Team Triad's Time OutTriad employees had a blast! If we play half as hard as we work, it was a much needed break. In a recent newsletter, Triad employees were pictured enjoying their afterhours time off. (In photo L to R: Corinne (Service Administrator), Piotr (Senior Service Technician), John Ornowski (Regional Account Manager), Rachel Weygandt (Regional Account Manager) - Somehow Dave Rosen (Service & Installation Manager) and Steve Monek (Regional Account Manager) seemed to avoid being photographed - they must have been at the buffet!

 Did you ever realize that you probably spend more time with your colleagues at the office than you do with your family and close friends? As a small business, Triad employees have become more than co-workers, we are a "work family". Most employees have been with the company for over 10 years. This not only speaks to our expertise and dedication to the customer, but it says alot about how we work as a team. Thankfully, it is not an office filled with drama and invasion of privacy. However, our office is very open in terms of layout and one can't help but to overhear what's going on in the cube or office next to them. Lunches together are common practice. In some cases it makes it easier to get things done because we are working with friends and don't have to sift through red tape to witness a flawless installation or quick resolution to a problem.

While we weren't all the greatest of bowlers (except for Steve who insisted on "practicing new techniques" instead of crushing the other team in defeat), we did hold our own. John and Dave were the dark horses and kept us from being humiliated by our opponent. I think Corinne, Piotr and I were there to reinforce that we were just there to have fun - or at least that's what we kept telling ourselves every time we got a gutter ball.

We all seem to have our own "thing" that we do outside of work that makes life fun and interesting. We're still waiting for a Triad sponsored "Johnnie O Karaoke Show" but I don't know if we really want everyone singing their hearts out in front of clients. However, NJRCC has regular networking events that Triad participates in and we are certainly looking forward to the next one where we can let our hair down a bit.

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Bowling for Business - Team Triad's Time Out

Bowling for Business - Team Triad's Time OutTriad employees had a blast! If we play half as hard as we work, it was a much needed break. In a recent newsletter, Triad employees were pictured

What to look for in a Security Vendor...

Longevity – How long has the company been in business? This will tell you how resourceful and resilient a business is. Good business practices are the foundation for a company’s longevity.

 

Triad is proudly celebrating 25 years of service this year!

 

Attitude – What is the company like to work with? The bottom line is we all work with people. A company’s attitude can make the difference between a project going well and it being a miserable experience for you.

 

Triad’s “Yes We Can!” attitude makes the implementation or service go swiftly and we respect that you have a business to run and do as much as possible to disrupt your daily business activities as little as possible.

Reputation – What do others say about the company? The company’s certifications, accreditations, awards and memberships are important to look at. More importantly, however, is what their customers say about them. Check references!

 

Wow! Get a load of the glowing references Triad has! Prestigious clients with household names, clients with complicated installations or requirements, clients who have been clients for all 25 years  - they all say the same thing: Triad is a pleasure to work with!

Industry Experience – How well does the company understand the unique needs of your industry? This will tell you how well the company can adapt to the unique needs of your company within that industry.

 

Since Triad doesn’t specialize in any one industry, we have grown to understand the unique needs of several industries. Triad Account Managers have an average of 12 years of experience working at Triad. It today’s day and age, that’s unheard of and it’s refreshing to know there are still companies where people want to work for and retire from.

 

Technological Expertise – Do they know their stuff? Technology changes at an exponential rate. The technicians who install and service your system need to be current on the equipment. Manufacturers are regularly releasing updates and new versions. It’s important that the company you work with recognizes that continuing education is critical and invaluable. State licensing requirements are also vital for a job done right from the beginning.

 

Triad technicians are factory trained and keep their certifications current. They are also required to maintain CEUs with the state for their alarm technician license or locksmith license as it applies. Continuing education is encouraged because it makes our team better technicians and serves our clients better overall.

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Loose Lips Sink Ships

...Isn't that how the saying goes? Well the same concept can be applied to messy desks and office security. Keeping a clean desk isn't only for those with OCD or who have a lot of time on their hands. Get into a simple routine and prevent things from getting lost, stolen or in the wrong hands. Keep in mind every day we all work with confidential client files and have our wallets or purses next to us...until we leave our office. We're not just talking about the secret recipe for Coca Cola - something a lot more personal, like your identity, could be stolen.

Here are a few ways to prevent these losses and keep your office area safe:

1.    Lock up private papers. Store your day planner, PDA, Blackberry and notebooks in a locked drawer. Consider taking them home at night. Keep your personal items in a locked briefcase or cabinet. Ladies, keep your pocketbooks in a locked drawer or cabinet. Leaving it on the floor by your chair is not secure especially if you leave your desk for meetings during the day and don't wan to lug it with you.

2.    Guard access tools. Keep cell phones and other handheld devices with you, along with keys and access cards. Notify security if access cards or keys go missing. In the event of an emergency evacuation, you may not have time to go back to your desk to get your keys and if the emergency is a big one, you'll be left looking for a ride home.

3.    "PC" stands for Personal Computer. Close applications and turn off monitor when you walk away from your desk (if its' for a while, turn off the computer.) Keep portable media such as CDs and iPods out of sight when not in use. Use a password protected screen saver. Never write down passwords. If you have trouble remembering all your passwords for various programs, there are applications that can be downloaded or purchased where you only have to remember the password to access the password keeper. The application then keeps a record of all your logins and passwords to an unlimited number of programs...it can even help you remember all those PIN numbers for debit and credit cards!

4.    Care for the fine printouts. Remove important printouts from printers before leaving the office. Shred sensitive documents when done. Regularly clear cache files from your computer and from memory devices such as printers.

5.    Watch your back. Desks and other furniture should be positioned so sensitive information is not viewable from hallways or windows. Close blinds on office windows if you are working with sensitive materials. Lock your office door when you're gone for an extended period.

For 25 years, Triad Security Systems has offered security systems to commercial and industrial clients. Triad Security Systems offers state of the art security solutions for clients in a variety of industries. We can help your business reduce inventory loss and loss due to employee or vendor theft or error. Call us today at 908-964-5252 to have a security expert review your security plan and offer quality technological solutions. Triad offers mechanical and electronic access control, video surveillance with analog or IP video cameras, licensed locksmith services such as key management, commercial lock maintenance and repair, intrusion (burglar) alarm & fire alarm detection and central station alarm monitoring and audio/video intercoms. Triad security experts can help you to deter criminals, prevent loss, detect illegal entry and report on daily activities in secured areas. Triad is a complete security solutions provider. Don’t hesitate to call us today! The investment you make today could not only help you save today but the long run as you protect your facility and assets.

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Is Your Access Control System Accessible?

Triad works with business of all sizes and in all industries. Many small and medium sized businesses will start with a basic fire alarm and/or intrusion alarm. These systems alert people inside the building when smoke or heat is detected and warm people to evacuate the building. Intrusion alarms are often armed when the last person leaves the office or building and alert the owner, security manager or other authorized persons of a situation where a person has entered the building after hours without permission or without disarming the intrusion alarm.

The next phase of security usually involves video surveillance and/or a card access system. These are great steps in monitoring the comings and goings of people in the building and deterring or preventing people from entering restricted areas (i.e. management only, employees only, etc.) In the case with access control, security  is maintained by keeping doors locked and allowing only those with appropriate credentials to have an easy method of gaining entry.  

An access control system can be simple or complex, depending on the requirements of that particular business. Systems range from one or two doors with very few users, to hundreds of doors with thousands of users. Systems can be administered by a workstation in one location or via the internet from any location where there is internet access. All systems, however, suffer from the same problem: while card access systems prevent unwanted visitors from gaining entry; those with legitimate needs have no way to request entry. Most of the time that person knocks or rings a doorbell until someone opens the door.

Unfortunately, opening the door for someone knocking or ringing the bell defeats the basic purpose of the card access system. The doors are secured and those who need access already have it. So who wants to get into your office? Someone who has forgotten or lost his credentials? A delivery? Or is it someone with the intent to harm? How can you be sure? Is the receptionist or office manager’s day disrupted frequently to answer open the door for deliveries and guests? How can they keep that responsibility and maintain their productivity? The answer is simple: install a video intercom.  

Video intercoms provide a safe and convenient method of notifying those on the secured side of a door that someone is requesting entry. The built-in camera supplies a clear view, allowing people to see and talk with visitors before opening, unlocking or even disrupting their productivity by having to get up and go to the door. Individuals can be greeted while their identity, intention, and even their frame of mind is determined. After verifying the purpose behind the visit, the touch of a button “buzzes” them in.

Triad account managers can help you to complete your security system with the addition of a video intercom. Triad offers products from only leading manufacturers in the industry and Triad technicians are factory trained.

For 25 years, Triad Security Systems has offered security systems to commercial and industrial clients. Triad Security Systems offers state of the art security solutions for clients in a variety of industries. We can help your business reduce inventory loss and loss due to employee or vendor theft or error. Call us today at 908-964-5252 to have a security expert review your security plan and offer quality technological solutions. Triad offers mechanical and electronic access control, video surveillance with analog or IP video cameras, licensed locksmith services such as key management, commercial lock maintenance and repair, intrusion (burglar) alarm & fire alarm detection and central station alarm monitoring and audio/video intercoms. Triad security experts can help you to deter criminals, prevent loss, detect illegal entry and report on daily activities in secured areas. Triad is a complete security solutions provider. Don’t hesitate to call us today! The investment you make today could not only help you save today but the long run as you protect your facility and assets.

*Disclaimer

 

 


Getting Hinky About Nigerian Scams

Nigerian advance-fee fraud scams are alive and well. Ben Rothke looks at a series of emails for clues that should set off any recipient's sense of danger.

 

By Ben Rothke, CISSP

August 31, 2009 - CSO

 

The first generation of computer viruses was relatively easy to identify and quarantine. Get infected, run your favorite scanner, the scanner quarantined the virus—end of story. This process worked fine until the virus writers became more sophisticated. In the early 1990's, the world of computer viruses changed radically when polymorphic viruses came on to the scene. While early viruses were easy to indentify by their static signature, polymorphic viruses mutate and rendered the first-generation of virus scanners useless.

Similarly, the first generation of Nigerian advance-fee fraud scams was relatively easy to identify. But the real challenge was getting people not to fall for those scams. As far back as 1997, the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs of the United States Department of State wrote a 33-page document [PDF link] that detailed the Nigerian advance-fee fraud scheme and how to avoid being a victim.

Also see Mind Games: How Social Engineers Win Your Confidence

The classic advance fee-fraud was somewhat limited in its scalability given that there are only so many permutations of murdered/deposed mothers, fathers, uncles, brothers and brother-in-laws, from corrupt governments in Nigeria, Somalia, Senegal and surroundings, and that over time, people would eventually become suspicious.

In response to growing consumer awareness the scammers started to do what the polymorphic viruses did—they mutated. However, while the scams are morphing, the end result is the same; the scammers get their money, and the victim is out, with no recourse.

With the tactics changing, what can you do to protect yourself from these scams? Technology and spam filters generally can't identify these emails. Scammers often compose their emails to not get flagged, and are often written like a prospectus sent from a legitimate firm. The best thing you can do is get a feel for these scams. Use your common sense, and remember the adage that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Finally and perhaps most importantly, develop your own sense of hinky.

What is hinky? In a fascinating article, BT Chief Security Technology Officer Bruce Schneier writes how terrorist Ahmed Ressam tried to enter the US from Canada with a suitcase bomb. Ressam was approached by U.S. Customs Agent Diana Dean, who asked him some routine questions and then decided he looked suspicious. Ressam was fidgeting, sweaty, jittery and avoided eye contact. In Dean's own words, he was acting hinky. Ressam's car was eventually searched, and he was finally discovered and detained.

Agent Dean did not use any fancy scanning technology; she used her experience and inner feelings to determine the hinky. And the rest is history.

Today's scammers require you to use your hinky to the maximum. Here is a recent scam where using hinky paid off.

Below are two screen shots from emails that initially, seem innocuous, but originate from scammers. For those without a well-developed sense of hinky, the invitation to the conference might be seem as complimentary or as a well-deserved honor. For those who reply without looking deeper, they are on their way to being scammed. This is unfortunate as these emails have a number of glaring aspects that help you recognize their fraudulent nature.  (exhibit A & exhibit B)

Here are a few red flags. While a single red flag does not necessarily render something a scam, when they number more than three, you should be extremely suspicious:

  • Source is Africa based, and BusinessDay writes that Africa is in a league all of its own when corruption is the barometer.
  • Return email address domain is usa.com, which is a link for finding cheap travel in the USA.
  • Email states "We are accepting you to partake because you were recommended by one of our staff". Legitimate emails would likely state the name of the staff member.
  • Contacts to reply to have domains of gmail.com, and usa.com. Usually a conference organizer will have a web site or dedicated domain, but not so in this case.
  • The contact phone numbers which have U.S. area codes redirect to Africa. When asked, the answering party stated they were in Washington, DC. When asked, they couldn't say what the weather was like in Washington, DC or even give the name the street of their supposed office there. When called about an hour later, the same person claimed they were in New York City. The answering party was unable to provide any information about the conference, and said to register and book a hotel room, and then hung up.
  • The email lists the conference website as www.aayo.co.cc. But co.cc is simply free domain name registrar.

Those who are hinky-challenged may respond and set themselves up as bait—which is exactly what the scammers are counting on. The email asks the party to supply a significant amount of personal data -- no legitimate conference would require that kind of information, and certainly not at such an early stage.

The email ends with a few paragraphs of irrelevant items to give it a semblance of legitimacy. It ends with contact information, but no physical address. (exhibit C)

If someone is foolish to respond by sending the information to the scammers, the heat will soon be on them. The scammers then send a confirmation email and advise the party that they then need to book a hotel room for their stay as detailed in the following email:

The attached registration forms are used to garner some additional personal information and give it a further semblance of legitimacy and the impression of a real conference. Once again, notice the contact information -- both of them have generic addresses, not one tied to a hotel chain.

If you reply to those, you get the next email in the chain where the scam comes full circle. The scammers ask you to wire your hotel deposit to them. (exhibit D)

Scammers always want to string the victim along and will always mix fact and fiction. In the email, the hotel claims to be a branch hotel under Accor Resorts, which is a legitimate chain. But hinky tells us that you should be able to book directly from the web site and secure the reservation with a credit card; not a cash wire transfer.

The scammers offer the victim two options for payment, of which only one will actually work, and they claim that it is the best method—specifically, the Western Union money transfer. They state they can only send the Official Letter of Hotel Confirmation letter upon receipt of the money. No legitimate hotel would ever do that.

For those who have been scammed this far, they may unsuspectingly send the money via Western Union. Once the scammers pick up their money, the scam has come full-circle. The scammers have your money and you have absolutely no resource or way to get your money back.

The reason scammers like Western Union is that it is extremely quick and reliable. Once the transferred money is picked up by the scammer, the victim unfortunately has absolutely no chance of recovering the money from Western Union.

Conclusion

Scammers are very creative and getting more sophisticated every day. They know people's weaknesses and use them to manipulate. Scammers continue to devise a never-ending set of variants on their frauds. While you can't defeat them, you can use your hinky to identify them, to ensure you don't become a victim.

Perhaps the best advice about dealing with such scams comes from Lankester Merrin, when he warned Damien Karras in The Exorcisthttp://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwcsoonlinec-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B000HEWEGC "The demon is a liar, he will lie to confuse us, but he will also mix lies with the truth to attack us. The attack is psychological, Damien, and powerful. So don't listen to him. Remember that - do not listen". Use your hinky, and don't listen to the scammers.

Ben Rothke CISSP, QSA (ben.rothke@bt.com) is a Senior Security Consultant with BT Professional Services and the author of Computer Security: 20 Things Every Employee Should Know (McGraw-Hill Professional Education)http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwcsoonlinec-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0072262826.

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Seven Deadly Sins of Social Networking

I have a professional Twitter account (follow me at Rachel4Triad) as well as a personal Facebook account and I know  I am guilty of a few of these mistakes. I received this email “Seven Deadly Sins of Social Networking Security” from a co-worker and I thought I’d pass it along to you bloggers out there. It seems there is a fine line between keeping your personal information personal and secure and reconnecting or networking with others. I don’t know that I would say that I’m addicted to the social networking sites but I do make a point to check in with them at least once a day. In some cases, as with my college roommates, it’s the primary way we keep in touch. Sometimes even when I’m on the phone with my dad, he’ll refer to something I tweeted or posted on my facebook page and I’ll wonder, “how did he even know about that?” Then I’ll remember that other people do actually read my pages just as you are reading this blog. So as I’m writing it, I feel somewhat protected that my thoughts are my personal thoughts, I realize I am letting other people get to know who I am – some of those readers I know and some are otherwise complete strangers. I realize as I standing in line at the grocery store that I wouldn’t dream of telling the checker or the person standing behind me about the sale I just closed or about the fact that have a pile of laundry still because I was too busy this past holiday weekend to get to it but somehow if I type it here or on one of the social networking sites that’s essentially what I’m doing.

 

If I could tell you anything right now what would it be? Well I’d tell you that I’m enjoying my job as a sales person and ask you to introduce me to 5 people you know that you think might have a need for security in their business. Is there someone you know who works in an office building – perhaps they are a tenant in an office park? Do you know someone who recently complained at work that people were dumping furniture or household garbage into their company’s dumpster over the weekend? Is there a company that recently had layoffs and is concerned about former employees having access to the building after hours? I’d like to meet all these people.

 

Until then, however, surf safely. Don’t put yourself in a vulnerable position that may result in a dangerous circumstance. If you have any other tips on how to keep secure online, I’d love to hear about them. For example, I know on Facebook, you can set your level of security/privacy and only allow your friends to be able to see your posts. Twitter gives you the option of having to approve followers before they can see your Tweets. These are just a couple in the vast cyberspace where so many of us spend so much of our waking hours.

 

 

From: www.csoonline.com

Seven Deadly Sins of Social Networking Security

To users of LinkedIn, Facebook, Myspace, Twitter or all of the above: Are you guilty of one of these security oversights?

 

by Bill Brenner, Senior Editor, CSO

June 30, 2009

 

Admit it: You are currently addicted to social networking. Your drug of choice might be Facebook or Twitter, or maybe Myspace or LinkedIn. Some of you are using all of the above, and using them hard, even IT security practitioners who know better.

 

While it's impossible to escape every social networking threat out there, there are steps one can take to significantly reduce the risks. CSOonline recently checked in with dozens of IT security professionals (ironically, using more than one social networking platform to do so) to pinpoint seven typical security mistakes people make; and how to avoid them.

 

1.    Over-sharing company activities
This is a sin of pride, when someone gets excited about something their company is working on and simply must tell everyone about it. Maybe you work for a drug company that is on the verge of developing the cure for cancer. Maybe the company is developing a new car that runs on curbside trash -- in other words, something everyone will want.

 

By sharing too much about your employer's intellectual property, you threaten to put it out of business by tipping off a competitor who could then find a way to duplicate the effort or find a way to spoil what they can't have by hiring a hacker to penetrate the network or by sneaking a spy into the building.

Then there are hackers controlling legions of botnets that could be programmed to scour a company's defenses and, upon finding a weakness, exploit it to access data on the intellectual property. With the data in hand, the hacker can then sell what they have to the highest bidder, which just might be your biggest competitor.

 

"Sharing this kind of information could lead to targeted attacks on specific technology-producing enterprises," says Souheil Mouhammad, a senior security expert at Altran Technologies.

This sin has sparked a debate in the security industry about whether companies need to revise their employee computer use policies with more specific language on what is/isn't allowed in the social networking arena.

 

To reign in the urge to share too much, it might be useful to repeat this saying, which has started to appear in the public domain: "Loose Tweets Sink Fleets."

 

2.    Mixing personal with professional
This sin is closely related to the first, but extends beyond the mere disclosure of company data. This is the case where someone uses a social network for both business and pleasure, most commonly on Facebook, where one's friends include business associates, family members and friends.

 

The problem is that the language and images one shares with friends and family may be entirely inappropriate on the professional side. A prospective employer may choose to skip to the next candidate after seeing pictures of you drunk or showing off a little too much leg at someone's birthday party. In sharing such things, you also stand a good chance of making the company you represent look bad.

 

"In my view one of the major rules when engaging in social networking is to be aware that your words belong in the public domain," says Paul V. de Souza, chief security engineer at AT&T. "You may be quoted all over the Internet, so make sure to choose your words carefully. Be diplomatic and extremely professional."

 

In some cases, it's nearly impossible to separate business from the personal on a social networking site. Those who work for media companies, for example, are sometimes required to use all their social networking portals to proliferate content in an effort to boost page views which, in turn, attract potential advertisers. But wherever and whenever possible, security practitioners work to keep each locked in their respective boxes.

 

"You have to understand very clearly what the objective of your presence on any given social network is. If it is for work, keep it for work only. If it is for personal/fun use, keep it for personal use only," says Benjamin Fellows, a senior IT security and risk consultant at Ernst & Young. "I can't tell you how many times I have been invited to Facebook by a work colleague only to find things on their wall or profile that are definitely not politically correct or are downright offensive. I keep all my work friends in LinkedIn and my personal friends in Facebook. Even then, I am very careful what I say on either site. I guess you could also put this under the heading of know your audience."

 

3.    Engaging in Tweet (or Facebook/LinkedIn/Myspace) rage
For the person who has just been laid off or had their professional integrity called into question online, the urge to fire back with a stream of vitriol can be irresistible. Call this a sin of wrath.

 

"You don't want to get into a flame war," says John Bruggeman, a Cincinnati-based IT director. "Be mindful of what you say and imagine you are at a party where everyone is listening, including your boss, spouse or future employer."

Scott Hayes, president and CEO of Database-Brothers Inc., agrees, saying, "Posting any content when angry is about as dangerous as sending flaming emails, if not more so. Think twice about clicking 'submit' because the world may be looking at your angry, immature rant for years."

 

4.    Believing he/she who dies with the most connections wins
For some social networkers, it's all about accumulating as many connections as possible. Folks on LinkedIn are notorious for doing this, especially those in such LinkedIn groups as TopLinked and LION. This may seem harmless enough or, at the worst, just annoying. But when the name of the game is quantity over quality, it's easy to link or "friend" a scam artist, terrorist or identity thief.

 

"Always verify the person who wants to get in contact with you," says Ruud van den Bercken, a security specialist at XS4ALL Internet in the Netherlands. "Do you know him or her? If not, why is the person trying to connect with you? Check if the profile of the other person is secured. If you can't retrieve a list of that person's connections, you have to ask yourself" if you really want to go down that road.

As San Francisco-based network and security architect/engineer Jatinder Thukral puts it: "I'd rather have 50 relevant contacts than 500 unknowns."

 

5.    Password sloth
Another common sin is one of laziness, in this case picking passwords for your social networks that you're least likely to forget. In many cases, that means using the same password for LinkedIn and Facebook that you're using for your online bank account or work machine. If someone with malicious intent figures out the password for one social network, that person can now go and access everything else.

 

"Using the same password on several sites is like trusting the weakest link in a chain to carry the same weight. Every site has vulnerabilities, plan for them to be exploited," says Daniel Philpott, information security engineer at OnPoint Consulting Inc.

 

6.    Trigger finger (clicking everything, especially on Facebook)
Facebook in particular is notorious as a place where inboxes are stuffed with everything from drink requests to cause requests. For some social networkers, clicking on such requests is as natural as breathing. Unfortunately, the bad guys know this and will send you links that appear to be from legitimate friends. Open the link and you're inviting a piece of malware to infect your machine. Christophe Veltsos, president of Prudent Security, describes this as being "click-happy" and warns, "Don't click unless you're ready to deal with drive-by downloads and zero-day attacks."

 

7.    Endangering yourself and others
All of the above tie into the seventh and perhaps most serious sin, which is that reckless social networking can literally put someone's life in danger. It could be a relative or co-worker. Or it could be yourself.

 

Security experts advise extreme caution when posting birthday information, too much detail on your spouse and children, etc. Otherwise, they could become the target of an identity thief or even a kidnapper.

 

For 25 years, Triad Security Systems has offered security systems to commercial and industrial clients. Triad Security Systems offers state of the art security solutions for clients in a variety of industries. We can help your business reduce inventory loss and loss due to employee or vendor theft or error. Call us today at 908-964-5252 to have a security expert review your security plan and offer quality technological solutions. Triad offers mechanical and electronic access control, video surveillance with analog or IP video cameras, licensed locksmith services such as key management, commercial lock maintenance and repair, intrusion (burglar) alarm & fire alarm detection and central station alarm monitoring and audio/video intercoms. Triad security experts can help you to deter criminals, prevent loss, detect illegal entry and report on daily activities in secured areas. Triad is a complete security solutions provider. Don’t hesitate to call us today! The investment you make today could not only help you save today but the long run as you protect your facility and assets.

*Disclaimer

 

Why Triad Understands YOU

I just returned from vacation. Ahhh… However, even when I’m on vacation I can’t help but to notice things that relate to my job. For example, I noticed every traffic camera on I-10 in Arizona not because they were stuck up on a poll blatantly in the middle of the highway but because one seemed to be pointed straight down and I wondered what the heck it was looking at. When I was at the spa in Scottsdale, I read a magazine about how to write effective blogs for your business. I apparently should be writing things that you want to know and not necessarily things that I want to tell you. I remember thinking as I sipped my ice water with lemon “well…duh!”.

 

The American economy now is a scary place. With major American car companies filing for bankruptcy, the end of an iconic era seems to be coming to an end. Companies that were at one time trend setters and leaders in their industries are begging for help and desperately trying to figure out how to keep their doors open. We all know someone or several people who have lost their jobs and finding a new one is rough.

 

So what are we supposed to do? It’s my opinion that we have to prioritize. Get back to basics. This certainly isn’t my proposal for how to fix the American economy but I know for myself, I’m doing simple things like turning lights off when I leave a room. Putting on a sweater if I’m cold or putting the air conditioner two or three degrees higher than I normally would. What does this mean for business? Well, I think small business owners especially are working their tails off to keep their employees in their jobs. Triad, for example, is not some big conglomerate who can save millions of dollars by laying off only 10% of its workforce. Yes, big business can keep their doors open and keep employing the other 90% of those people. At Triad, just like our customers, everyone has a name. There are 23 employees here. The company president says “good morning” personally to everyone in the office. The operations manager and the company vice president have had meetings to discuss policy and procedure changes that started with a simple exchange at the coffee pot.

 

It is the small business that is keeping our economy going. While I love the self-check out at Stop-n-Shop or the variety that I can experience at Lowes, I’m finding that I’m willing to pay just a little more for the produce at the local produce stand I pass on my way home because it tastes that much fresher. And I’m getting much more personal attention from the guy at the local hardware store when I need help with a DIY project. Don’t get me wrong. The big businesses have great people and I’ve had very good experiences there too. I just know in my world…everyone at my company, Triad, has a name. I think just about everyone in my company knew I was on vacation last week and not only that – they knew where I went and wanted to see some pictures! The same attention that we give to one another as co-workers we give ten fold to our clients. We enjoy being part of your lives. We love to be on the email list to your friends telling us that your daughter had a baby girl over the weekend. We share in your anxiety as your oldest child gets ready to go off to college. We’re regular guys (and gals) just like you. You are part of our world. The stories you share with us become part of our story.

 

Back to the economy…what do we do about it as a nation? Well, I can tell you that I’m really picky when it comes to service these days. Consumers, myself included, have a limited amount of disposable income and when I choose a vendor for something I do expect them to appreciate the fact that I chose them and treat me with respect and show their gratitude by being honest and thorough with the job they do for me. I expect the same things from my dry cleaner and mechanic and landscaper that I give freely to my own clients.

 

I’m looking for quality of workmanship and quality and attentiveness of service. Triad is celebrating 25 years of service in the security industry this year. That’s not because we’ve nickel and dimed every chump we’ve come across. When a vendor does a poor job, word definitely gets around. Looking for a security company? Did you know we are experts in access control, video surveillance (including IP camera and remote monitoring), intrusion and fire alarms and intercoms? Did you know Triad has licensed locksmiths on staff? Did you know that we really do understand if we can’t start that implementation next Wednesday because you have your son’s nursery school commencement ceremony? We are that company. We get it. If you haven’t done so already, call us today for a security assessment. Meet with one of our security experts and learn about how we can help you prevent losses and protect your employees, assets and facilities. (908) 964-5252

 

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Quality Isn't Expensive...It's Priceless

"This case clearly illustrates that the threat of terrorism in New York is persistent," Governor Paterson of New York said in a statement. Four men were arrested yesterday after being investigated for over a year. Their attempt to bomb a New York synagogues and a New York military base failed thank goodness. The scary part from my perspective is that 3 of the four men were American citizens (the other was of Haitian decent). These were people who were raised in American and whatever path their life took, they turned against the freedoms afforded to Americans and decided that America and certain people in our society were bad people. The First Amendment gives us the right to think and express ourselves freely so we don’t all have to get along necessarily – we don’t all have to get along. However, these four men not only wanted to express their disagreement with people of the Jewish faith, they wanted to kill them and cause mayhem.

 

I have to say that I am grateful that I work for a company that helps businesses, organizations and government buildings secure. Now is the time if your business doesn’t have any protections beyond a door lock and key to have a security consultation. I recently sat in on a webinar that listed the #1 reason why business owners do not have a video surveillance system is because they perceive them to be too expensive. First, this is not always the case and there are many solutions that are not exceptionally expensive. Is there a cost? Yes. Is it worth it? Absolutely. Now I’ve heard quite a few cliques - one says, “Quality isn’t cheap and cheap isn’t quality” and another “Quality isn’t expensive, it’s priceless.” It’s like that first aid kit I have in my trunk. It cost me $30 for the first aid kit in my trunk. When I bought it I remember thinking about how $30 seemed like a lot of money for just some band-aids and rubber gloves. I know, though, that even if I only use it once – the idea that I have this consortium of supplies like tweezers, an ice pack and antiseptic wipes – is going to be comforting and helpful to someone in a time of need – maybe even crisis. Apply that to having a security system. A business owner doesn’t need to go above and beyond what is needed but if it is at all affordable, I would strongly recommend doing it and doing it now before something happens and, after the fact, you find yourself saying, “if I had a camera or something, maybe I would have seen something or maybe we could have caught the guy.”

 

Second, if you are going to invest some of your budget dollars or make a capital investment into securing your facility, it’s worth doing it right. If you were diagnosed with a heart condition you wouldn’t get advice on your health from the waitress at the diner because her ex-husband’s father was a cardiologist, right? Of course not. You’d find the best cardiologist that you could afford and do what he/she tells you in order to prevent a heart attack. Just like if I wanted to secure my facility, I would want a quality system that I knew was reliable and I’d want to work with a company who could service my system when I needed it and was factory trained on the equipment they installed. I wouldn’t do it myself with only an 800 number to call for technical support. Let’s face it, my first aid kit and all the gauze in it isn’t going to be of any help to someone who is on the bottom of a massive car accident. I’m going to call professionals who know what they are doing and have been trained with the latest equipment to save that person’s life. So just because I can buy a 4 camera surveillance system from a big box store for $500 doesn’t mean it’s worth my money. You’ve got $500 for security? Great! Call an expert from Triad and talk to them about a plan for getting a quality security system installed. Maybe leasing a system would be a good option for you, maybe you can use better technology and not use 4 cameras – maybe two. The point is you don’t know until you talk to someone who knows the industry and has experience with your application and is familiar with all of the latest technology on the market.

 

Understand I’m not trying to scare you into buying a security system. I’m inviting you to use this news about these domestic terrorist as an opportunity to make a plan for securing your business, your assets and, most importantly, your employees. Sometimes it’s not equipment you’re trying to keep people from stealing or desks you’re trying to prevent from being vandalized – it’s people. You’re protecting and keeping safe the animal lover that sits on the other side of the cube wall who told you this morning about the neighbor’s new puppy she played with the night before or the manager whose wedding you attended last weekend or the account manager who’s desk is plastered with pictures of his family and who is looking forward to spending the weekend with his children down the shore. Thank God that no one was hurt in these attempts to bomb the synagogue. I’m sure there would be millions of dollars worth of damage and the community would come together and rebuild itself. Just consider that you may not need 150 cameras watching every square inch of your property and you don’t need to have your employees swipe their access card every time they walk into the restroom but maybe it would be helpful to put up a few cameras in the parking lot and a couple to monitor the entrances and exits of the office. Maybe being able to permit access to certain areas at certain times would be a good way of keeping everyone safe. What is peace of mind worth to you?

 


News Article: Four terror attack plotters nabbed

 


For 25 years, Triad Security Systems has offered security systems to commercial and industrial clients. Triad Security Systems offers state of the art security solutions for clients in a variety of industries. We can help your business reduce inventory loss and loss due to employee or vendor theft or error. Call us today at 908-964-5252 to have a security expert review your security plan and offer quality technological solutions. Triad offers mechanical and electronic access control, video surveillance with analog or IP video cameras, licensed locksmith services such as key management, commercial lock maintenance and repair, intrusion (burglar) alarm & fire alarm detection and central station alarm monitoring and audio/video intercoms. Triad security experts can help you to deter criminals, prevent loss, detect illegal entry and report on daily activities in secured areas. Triad is a complete security solutions provider. Don’t hesitate to call us today! The investment you make today could not only help you save today but the long run as you protect your facility and assets.

*Disclaimer

Guess what - Security Systems Deter Crime in Newark

 

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A co-worker handed me this article in an industry magazine and said, “Here I thought this was pretty cool for the newsletter or something.” It was entitled, “Rutgers study finds alarm systems are valuable crime fighting tool.” No s***! Kind of an obvious conclusion, don’t you think? Of course having a burglar alarm for your home would make it less attractive to intruders, right? Well this study “was conducted with the cooperation of the Newark Police Department and reviewed five years of police data. The more than 300-page study was conducted over a two-year period and funded by the non-profit Alarm Industry Research and Education Foundation.  Apparently this type of study “helps police deploy their limited resources more efficiently.” It goes on to say that “it is the most comprehensive study of its kind because it uses in-depth research techniques..[We] were able to eliminate the variables that impact crime rates and focus directly on the impact alarm systems have on residential burglaries.”  Affordability for middle class homeowners has been a factor in the last 5 years. I found this article to be, and I say this with the most amount of respect as possible, a joke,or more specifically, I find that there’s some organization that would do a study and pay money to research this information. Let me think about this…I would tend to believe that most break-ins are not done by career burglars. They don’t look like George Clooney, Brad Pitt and Matt Damon and they don’t have maps of neighborhoods and mock safes to practice on beforehand. Especially in a struggling city like Newark, NJ, I would imagine there are some desperate people who are likely hooked on drugs or have some type of untreated mental illness who are more likely the intruders.
 
So, gee, if I’m a middle class resident of Newark and I have an alarm system and someone who’s mentally incapacitated (either chemically or biologically) sees the “property protected by Triad Security Alarm” sticker in my window, he/she is going to keep walking? Or perhaps it’s because word gets out that a certain block of houses on Mt. Prospect Avenue isn’t worth going to because Jimmy caught a case after he broke into a house there and now he’s doing a 5 flat for burglary. They’ve all got alarm systems and the cops pay attention??? I wonder if the study took into account the fact that the city of Newark has displaced hundreds of families who were living in low income house projects to other towns or into townhouse type communities where police sit outside and watch the drug deals go down. The article mentions how the study helps police with their limited resources. Perhaps the organization should consider deploying resources to arrest the dealers in the projects or hanging outside the bodegas instead of using Newark’s finest to participate in a study of whether or not security deterrents actually deter criminal activity. I’m not saying I have the answers but I’m saying there’s something missing here. I’d like to know by how much exactly crime in areas where there were alarms has decreased compared to areas wehre there are no known alarms. The only other reference point I have to compare this to is car alarms. My car has a car alarm on it. Yours probably does too if you have power locks. How many times have you gone to the mall or the grocery store or even in your parking lot at work and heard a car alarm going off? Did you do anything about it – see what car it was? Call the police? Alert the security desk in your building? I don’t. Sadly, I’m almost embarrassed to say that most people would probably do the same thing if they heard a house alarm just go inside and complain about how annoying it is. Maybe they’d call the police simply because of the noise problem rather than the fact that someone may have broken into the house. Where were these houses in the study located? Businesses have alarms in most cases – in Newark most businesses on Broadway just north of the police station have gates that come down over their doors and windows at night. I see lots of security cameras. I also still see gangs and dealers in the area too.
 
Working in the security industry, I believe that security systems do deter wrong doers from committing crimes. Is it perfect? No. I think in most cases, however, the security cameras are there to catch the criminal after the fact and prosecute. The security alarm sticker on my house or my car for that matter might make the guy go to the next house or the next car instead of dealing with my alarm just in case. And that’s why I have a security system…just in case. I know it’s not foolproof. And I know if everyone in America had a security system that there would still be crime. There would still be break ins. There would still be desperate people willing to do desperate things.  I think if I was one of the few on my block that didn’t have a security system, that I’d be inviting crime into my home. If I have no guard up, I’m asking for it basically. If I at the very least put up my best defense to protect my home and my loved ones, I’m at least willing to fight back and not passively let you Mr. or Ms. Criminal just come and take what I worked so hard for and what I care so deeply about. That’s just my 2 cents.
“Rutgers Study Finds Alarm Systems are Valuable Crime Fighting Tool,” Security Products. May 2009,  page 16.
 
For 25 years, Triad Security Systems has offered security systems to commercial and industrial clients. Triad Security Systems offers state of the art security solutions for clients in a variety of industries. We can help your business reduce inventory loss and loss due to employee or vendor theft or error. Call us today at 908-964-5252 to have a security expert review your security plan and offer quality technological solutions. Triad offers mechanical and electronic access control, video surveillance with analog or IP video cameras, licensed locksmith services such as key management, commercial lock maintenance and repair, intrusion (burglar) alarm & fire alarm detection and central station alarm monitoring and audio/video intercoms. Triad security experts can help you to deter criminals, prevent loss, detect illegal entry and report on daily activities in secured areas. Triad is a complete security solutions provider. Don’t hesitate to call us today! The investment you make today could not only help you save today but the long run as you protect your facility and assets.
 

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